A Very Special Bank Account

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Imagine you had a bank account that deposited $86,400 each morning. The account carries over no balance from day to day, allows you to keep no cash balance, and every evening cancels whatever part of the amount you had failed to use during the day. What would you do? Draw out every dollar each day!

We all have such a bank. Its name is Time. Every morning, it credits you with 86,400 seconds. Every night it writes off, as lost, whatever time you have failed to use wisely. It carries over no balance from day to day. It allows no overdraft so you can’t borrow against yourself or use more time than you have. Each day, the account starts fresh. Each night, it destroys an unused time. If you fail to use the day’s deposits, it’s your loss and you can’t appeal to get it back.

There is never any borrowing time. You can’t take a loan out on your time or against someone else’s. The time you have is the time you have and that is that. Time management is yours to decide how you spend the time, just as with money you decide how you spend the money. It is never the case of us not having enough time to do things, but the case of whether we want to do them and where they fall in our priorities.

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5 Grammar Errors That You Can Avoid

We do Grammar lapses most of the time, unless we check it out. Here are some few reminders to improve yourself.

Apostrophe

1. Incorrect Use of Apostrophe

One of the most common grammar errors is the incorrect use of the apostrophe.
Here are the rules:
1. If the noun is singular and doesn’t end in an “s,” add an apostrophe and an “s.”
Example: The car’s horn was loud.
2. Note: If the noun is singular and ends in an “s,” add the apostrophe after the “s.”
Example: The species’ features showed how it can survive in water.
Note: If the noun is plural, add the apostrophe after the “s.”
Example: The cats’ beds were in the back of the house.

 

wrong word

2. Using the Wrong Word

One of the biggest grammar issues is to use the wrong word. Many words sound like other words but have very different meanings. For example, its vs. it’s, their vs. there and your vs. you’re.
Its vs. It’s

Its is a possessive pronoun.

Example: My neighbor’s dog didn’t like to sleep in its dog house.

It’s is a contraction of “it is” or “it has.”

Example: It’s fun when Grandma comes to visit.

Their vs. There

Their is an adjective that means something belongs to someone.

Example: It was their house.

There is an adverb that means at that place.

Example: Place the box there.

Your vs. You’re

Your is an adjective that shows something belongs to you.

Example: Your phone has been ringing all day.

You’re is a contraction of “you” and “are.”

Example: You’re going to love your car.

me n I

3. Incorrect Use of Me vs. I

Does this one confuse you big time? Is it correct to say “Give it to me.” Or, should you say “Give it to I.” Here’s how to figure out which word to use to avoid this common grammar error.
Basically the rule is that you use “I” if you are the subject of the sentence and you use “me” if you are the object of the sentence.

I is a subject pronoun and refers to the person doing to action of the verb.

Example: I went to the store.

Example: Tom and I are friends with the teacher.

Me is an object pronoun and is the person to which the action is done.

Example: My mother gave me twenty dollars when I went to the store.

Example: The teacher should ask Tom or me.

Still confused?
Here’s a tip: To decide whether to use “me” or “I” with another name, just remove the other name.

For example: If you remove “Mary” from “Mary and I went to the park.” you would be left with “I went to the park.” That sounds correct because it is correct.

However, if you remove “Mary” from “She gave the book to Mary and I.” you would be left with “She gave the book to I.” That sounds incorrect because it is incorrect.

ending phrase with prep

4. Ending a Sentence with a Preposition.

Watch Out for Where You Put the Preposition

A common grammar debate is whether it is poor grammar to end a sentence with a preposition such as “with” or “for.” Current convention is that it is not correct to end a sentence with a preposition; however, it is OK if the alternative would create confusion.

Example with preposition at the end: What street does she live on?

Correction to change the position of the preposition: On what street does she live?

between n among

5. Incorrect Use of Between vs. Among

Between Three vs. Among Many Things

Between is an adverb that refers to two or more things.

Example: She parked between the two cars at the curb.

Among is a preposition that refers to things that are part of a group.

Example: She placed her gift among all the gifts on the table.

 

Grammar Mistakes You Are Probably Making Every Day

confusing listeners
Are You Confusing Your Listeners?

Congratulations! You are probably catching your written grammar mistakes because you are proofreading what you write; but, are you sure you aren’t making grammar mistakes in conversation? If you don’t know…read on.
Here are five frequently-made mistakes you could be making with your spoken grammar:

  • Not speaking in full sentences – A sentence must have a subject and a verb.
  • Inconsistent use of number in subject and verb – If the subject is singular, the verb must be singular.
  • Further vs. farther – “Further” shows an estimated distance. “Farther” shows a measurement.
  • Who vs. that – You should use “who” when you are referring to a person. You should use “that” to refer to an object.
  •  Lay vs. lie – You “lay” something down. People “lie” down.

 

Reference

 

WHO Declares “Gaming” as a Mental Disorder

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The World Health Organization, the public health division of the United Nations, has released its newest list of classified diseases–and “gaming disorder” is included. A draft of the WHO’s International Classification of Diseases (ICD) describes this as being characterized by a “pattern of persistent or recurrent gaming behaviour” online or offline.
The description goes on to say that gaming disorders can include the following: “1) impaired control over gaming (e.g., onset, frequency, intensity, duration, termination, context); 2) increasing priority given to gaming to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other life interests and daily activities; and 3) continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences.”

People suffering from the so-called “gaming disorder” run the risk of “significant impairment” to their personal, family, social, education, and occupational lives, according to the WHO. The description goes on to say that “gaming disorder” can be a continuous condition or it can be episodic or recurrent in nature. For it to be suggested that a person has “gaming disorder,” they would display these behaviour patterns for a year or longer.

The WHO also has a listing for “hazardous gaming,” which the organisation says “refers to a pattern of gaming, either online or offline that appreciably increases the risk of harmful physical or mental health consequences to the individual or to others around this individual.”

It goes on to say: “The increased risk may be from the frequency of gaming, from the amount of time spent on these activities, from the neglect of other activities and priorities, from risky behaviours associated with gaming or its context, from the adverse consequences of gaming, or from the combination of these. The pattern of gaming is often persists in spite of awareness of increased risk of harm to the individual or to others.”

Speaking to the BBC, technology addiction specialist Dr. Richard Graham said he welcomes the WHO’s decision to making “gaming disorder” a recognised disease. “It is significant because it creates the opportunity for more specialised services. It puts it on the map as something to take seriously,” he said. At the same time, he said he worries that it could also lead to “confused parents whose children are just enthusiastic gamers.”

gaming 2

Not everyone is thrilled with the WHO’s decision to recognise gaming addition as a medical condition. The Entertainment Software Association, which represents the video game industry’s interests in Washington DC and organizes E3 every year, said the move “recklessly trivializes real mental health issues.”

“Just like avid sports fans and consumers of all forms of engaging entertainment, gamers are passionate and dedicated with their time,” the ESA said in a statement to Gamasutra. “Having captivated gamers for more than four decades, more than 2 billion people around the world enjoy video games.”

“The World Health Organization knows that common sense and objective research prove video games are not addictive. And, putting that official label on them recklessly trivializes real mental health issues like depression and social anxiety disorder, which deserve treatment and the full attention of the medical community. We strongly encourage the WHO to reverse direction on its proposed action.”

The newest ICD draft is not yet finalized, so things could change regarding its content and language. We’ll report back with more details as they become available.

Reference

Tobacco Meets Technology

smoking in IQOS

The idea of heating tobacco (instead of burning it), have managed to find a way to adult smokers.Over 3.7 million consumers have already chosen to switch from cigarettes to this product: The tobacco heating system IQOS.
IQOS are sophisticated electronics that heat specially designed heated tobacco units. IQOS heats the tobacco just enough to release a flavorful nicotine-containing vapor but without burning the tobacco.
Here’s the key point: the tobacco in a cigarette burns at temperatures in excess of 600°C, generating smoke that contains harmful chemicals. But IQOS heats tobacco to much lower temperatures, up to 350°C, without combustion, fire, ash, or smoke. The lower temperature heating releases the true taste of heated tobacco. Because the tobacco is heated and not burned, the levels of harmful chemicals are significantly reduced compared to cigarette smoke.
What is there? A nicotine-containing vapor – not smoke – that makes IQOS a smoke-free product that is appealing to smokers.

Diagram 2

How does IQOS work?
IQOS is a tobacco heating system with three main components – a heated tobacco unit (called HEETS or HeatSticks), an IQOS holder, and a charger.

  • To use IQOS, a consumer inserts the heated tobacco unit into the IQOS holder, which contains an electronically controlled heater.
  • The consumer pushes a button to turn on the heater, and then draws on the heated tobacco unit to enjoy the real taste of heated tobacco. Once the heated tobacco unit is finished, the consumer removes it from the holder, and then it can be disposed of safely in a waste bin. When needed, the consumer recharges the holder by inserting it into the charger.
  • The heated tobacco unit contains a uniquely processed tobacco plug designed for heating, not for smoking. The tobacco plug is made from tobacco leaves, which are ground and re-constituted into tobacco sheets, called cast-leaf. These sheets are then crimped and made into a tobacco plug.
  • The holder, into which the heated tobacco unit is inserted, heats the tobacco via an electronically controlled heating blade. The blade simultaneously heats the tobacco to temperatures up to 350°C, while monitoring its temperature to ensure a consistent taste experience and to avoid burning. It also has an over-heating protection mechanism, which turns itself off if necessary. The holder supplies heat to the heated tobacco unit via the heating blade for six minutes or 14 puffs, whichever comes first.
  • After each heated tobacco unit experience, the small battery in the holder needs to be recharged. The charger houses a bigger battery that stores enough energy to recharge the holder approximately 20 times and can be recharged from household power sockets.

Reference

This article is purely for information, and stiil holds on to No Smoking Campaign
especially to young adults.

5 Tips to Giving Students Feedback

tips feedback image

Feedback is information about how one is doing in an effort to reach their goal. Here are five tips to help you give effective and meaningful feedback to students in your classroom.

One best practice is to give students effective and meaningful feedback. However, I have found that often, when I talk to people about feedback, they confuse it with advice or criticism. That is not what feedback is. Feedback is information about how one is doing in an effort to reach their goal. Here are five tips to help you give effective and meaningful feedback to students in your classroom.
Giving students feedback does not simply mean focusing on critiques for the students; it also means letting students know what they’re doing well. This blog post shares five tips for giving effective and helpful feedback to students, so click through to get all of the tips.

feedback

1.) Make sure that it’s actually tailored to that specific person and is based on their needs. It should not be based on the person but rather the goal that is being worked on. It is easy to mix our personal feelings toward an individual in with our feedback.

2.) It should always be timely. That means relatively quickly. I remember when I first started teaching, I would not return papers graded for weeks after. Apparently, that was frowned upon. Understandably so! Students need to know right away, within a reasonable amount of time, how well they met their goal. It can be in the form of verbal, written, computer-based, or even peer-reviewed feedback, when taught appropriately.

3.) Make sure it is balanced. Students need to hear both things that are positive (their strengths) and things that they need to improve. It’s easy to get caught up on only the negative. Along with this, I want to mention that your message should be balanced in the respect that your verbal message should match your nonverbal message. Sometimes we say we’re there to help, but our body language says something totally different.

4.) Make sure it is detailed. I remember one time getting a test back in college, seeing the grade, and being completely shocked. I didn’t understand; I knew that material! I had no idea what I did wrong. Yet, we as teachers do this often (myself included). How often do we give a student a grade, such as a C, and not explain what specifically they did wrong? We need to make sure the feedback is detailed, is useful, and tells the student how to improve (and, of course, all in kid-friendly language).

5.) Assist students to use the feedback to set goals. We need to help students set realistic and tangible goals that can help them self-assess and reflect. This allows us to check in frequently, give ongoing feedback, and help students become successful.

Without it, we cannot improve or become successful. Instead we just stumble around hoping to achieve. It’s extremely crucial that teachers help students by giving effective and meaningful feedback regularly in their classroom.

Reference

FOOD FOR THOUGHT—NUTRIENTS FOR BRAIN HEALTH

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Your brain is powerful. You can even use it to think about how the brain itself works. Crazy, right? But this power doesn’t make your brain immune to factors that impact the rest of your body. Lifestyle and environment can affect your brain health. Luckily, there are nutrients for brain health shown to support cognitive function.
Lipids
For a long time, dietary fats (lipids) have been connected to brain health. Originally, lipids’ effect on the cardiovascular system was thought to facilitate that connection. But more recent research shows dietary fats have more direct actions on the brain.
Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (like DHA from fish oil) normally make up cell membranes throughout your body. And like other saturated fat, they’re fundamental building blocks for your brain cells. That’s part of the reason fish is often called a brain food.
Flavonoids
The antioxidant effects of flavonoids are well-established in a test-tube setting. But these plant compounds—like cocoa, ginkgo, and grape-seed extracts—have more complex actions in the body that is continually being researched.
Some flavonoids show promising results in maintaining healthy brain function. Quercetin—a flavonoid that’s a major component of ginkgo biloba extracts—has been shown to maintain memory and learning abilities in some studies. Further research on the subject is needed.
B Vitamins
Adequate levels of the B vitamin folate are essential for brain function. The proof? Folate deficiency can lead to neurological disorders, like depression and cognitive impairment.
Clinical trial results have deepened the connection between folate and cognitive function. These studies have shown folate supplementation—by itself or in conjunction with other B vitamins (B6 and B12)—to be effective at maintaining healthy cognitive function during aging.
Other Nutrients
There are more nutrients for brain health. Here’s a short list of the other nutrients with researched roles in brain health:
Alpha lipoic acid has been shown to maintain memory and cognitive function.
Vitamin E, or α-tocopherol, has also been implicated in cognitive performance. Decreasing serum levels of vitamin E were associated with poor memory performance in older individuals.
Curcumin is a strong antioxidant that seems to protect the brain from lipid peroxidation and nitric-oxide-based radicals.
Several gut hormones or peptides—like leptin, ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) and insulin—have been found to support healthy emotional response and cognitive processes.
Energy Production
The brain runs your body. And it takes a lot of energy to literally be the brain of the operation. Healthy macronutrients are necessary to fuel your brain and provide the energy it needs.

The mechanisms involved in the transfer of energy from foods to neurons are likely to be fundamental to the control of brain function. Processes that are associated with the management of energy in neurons can affect brain plasticity.
Far-Reaching Impacts
Lifestyle and diet have long-term effects on your health. That means they are likely underestimated for their importance to public health—especially when it comes to healthy aging. But they’re important to your brain. The gradual and sometimes imperceptible cognitive decline that characterizes normal aging can be influenced by the nutrients you feed your brain through a healthy diet.
These impacts go beyond your life, too. Through epigenetics, you pass on traits to your children and their children. Newer studies back this up. They indicate that these nutritional effects on your brain might even be transmitted over generations by influencing epigenetic events.

Reference

How Gadgets and Digital Screens Are Harming Your Child

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How Gadgets and Digital Screens Are Harming Your Child

The amount of time children spend watching digital screens is worrying. Children don’t seem to get tired of watching TV or playing with the iPad. This obsession with gadgets is a matter of concern, but the immediate worry is about its adverse impact on their vision.
Why gadgets and kids don’t mix well
Kids use gadgets for playing games, chatting, browsing or watching movies. The activity is usually so involving that they don’t take their attention off the screen. They also don’t pay attention to things like posture, screen distance, and brightness, which can adversely affect their vision and health.

Staring at electronic screens for extended periods causes discomfort. You suffer from dry eyes, eye irritation and find it difficult to focus for a while. Spending too much time in one posture can also result in neck and back ache. If you are finding it difficult to cope with screen time, imagine what your child’s eyes must be going through.
Digital screens have become an inseparable part of life. You can’t wish them away or keep kids away from them, but you can minimize their impact on your children. The first step is to understand what you are up against.

The consequences of too much screen time
According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an average child spends about 8 hours a day watching electronic screens. Gadget use among kids increases with age. Although it cannot be said with certainty, research indicates that children spending too much time staring at screens are at higher risk of long-term vision problems. Apart from televisions and video games, most gadgets came in the last two decades. While the immediate effects on children can be observed, their long-term effects are unknown.
According to researchers, children who spend a lot of time with gadgets are likely to develop temporary myopia (nearsightedness). Fortunately, the effect is transient and the eyes recover a few minutes after they switch to a non-screen activity.
The effect of spending a lot of time watching screens is not limited to the eyes alone. Apart from symptoms like dry eyes, burning sensation, double vision and blurry vision, people also complain of headaches and posture-related problems like neck and back pain. Doctors now call this set of symptoms as “computer vision syndrome”.

gadget 2

When people use electronic screens, they blink less. On an average, a person blinks about 15 times in a minute. Due to the high attention required while using an electronic screen, this rate can drop to less than 5 times in a minute.

Blinking is a natural mechanism that keeps the eyes moist, lubricated and clean. A lower blink rate causes dry eyes and irritation. The severity varies according to the type of activity and the level of engagement. A video game, therefore, creates more eyestrain because you have to constantly watch and respond to what is happening on screen. Desktop computers and wall-mounted televisions can make it worse because they make you look upwards. This makes you open your eyes wider and expose more surface area of the eye to evaporation.

Electronic screens can generate images with a lot of brightness and contrast and they can vary these images in a fraction of a second. They also reflect glare from surrounding light sources like lamps and windows. Your eyes have to frequently respond to changing light levels. Watching a screen that is too dim or bright compared to the surroundings also causes eye strain. Your eyes have to adjust when you switch from the screen to the surroundings. The frequent dilation and contraction of pupils results in eye fatigue.
Most modern gadgets come with LED screens because they produce clearer pictures and consume less power. The amount of blue light emitted by these screens is a matter of concern. LED screens emit a lot more blue light compared to LCD screens. Although research is limited, many optometrists suspect that blue light can cause irreversible damage to the retina. This can increase the risk of macular degeneration and cataract.
The macula is the central part of the retina and is crucial to good vision. Macular degeneration can make daily activities like reading and driving impossible. With age, the lenses of the eyes start to yellow. For adults, this provides a limited natural defense against blue light, but children are vulnerable. Blue light can also interfere with the biological clock and affect sleep.

Protecting children from the adverse impacts of electronic screens

If your child complains of burning eyes, you must review the amount of time they are spending with gadgets. Here are some tips that will help.

Limit screen time
Limit the amount of time your children spend watching TV. Limit other gadget time to an hour a day for small children and two hours a day for school going children. Break this allowance into two or three sessions to reduce eye strain.

Encourage children to play outdoors
Gadgets encourage sedentary habits which are bad for the body and mind. Encourage children to spend some time outdoors for activities that require them to move about and interact with other children. Playing outdoors with the dog or other kids is more fun than watching an animation movie for the umpteenth time. Spending time outdoors also exercises long distance vision and reduces the chances of myopia.
Don’t use gadgets as babysitters
Keeping your children busy with gadgets or TV may allow you to do whatever you want in peace, but it’s a bad idea. Instead, keep them occupied with healthier alternatives like creative toys, coloring books or storybooks.

Ensure that your child gets adequate sleep
Children should sleep for about 10 hours a day. Sleep allows the eyes to recover from strain.

Ask them to take regular breaks and blink often.
To prevent dry eyes, ask your child to blink two to three times whenever their eyes begin to hurt. Eye strain can be reduced by taking small breaks to look at something other than the screen. Most opticians advocate the 20-20-20 rule. Take a break every 20 minutes and focus on something about 20 feet away for 20 seconds.

Ensure that kids maintain the right distance from the screen
While using a computer or other personal device, the eye should be at least 20 inches away from the screen. Don’t let children sit too close while watching TV. If your child prefers to sit close to the screen, get his or her eyes tested to rule out myopia.

Don’t let them use gadgets in the dark or in sunlight
Kids may not pay attention to lighting conditions when they are engrossed in an activity. Discourage the use of gadgets in a dark room or in bright sunlight. Screen brightness should not be three times darker or brighter than the surroundings. If the device has an auto-brightness mode, enable it. This automatically adjusts screen brightness according to ambient light.

Digital screens cause eyestrain and other related symptoms like vision difficulties and headache. Kids are more vulnerable than adults and spending too much time with gadgets can affect their vision. It is difficult to keep children away from gadgets, but you can take steps to minimize the adverse effects.

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